Santa Cruz Island


2012.04.18. - 2012.04.21.

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The landing pier at Prisoner's Harbor on Santa Cruz island

The landing pier at Prisoner's Harbor on Santa Cruz island

Intro

The Channel Islands have been on our radar for a while, but we never made any serious plans to visit them. Once, when some relatives were visiting from Europe, we took them whale watching on an Island Packers boat from Ventura, and that trip briefly visited Scorpion's Anchorage on Santa Cruz to drop off and pick up passengers. There's not much to see of the island from that landing, but even what we saw looked impressive and we kept talking more and more about spending some time there.

During our Backbone Trail hike in spring 2012, the islands were very much a topic of conversation and an organizer even mentioned that supposedly fewer people have been to all the Channel Islands than to the summit of Mt. Everest. Some fellow hikers were even organizing a trip, but then nothing came of it.

So at the end of March, we decided to go. I consulted the maps, read up on the basic information, and decided to start with Santa Cruz, and it looked the least forbidding and perhaps the most scenic of all the islands in the chain. It has a long history, Native Americans have lived there, smugglers used it later, then it had a huge ranching operation, which almost devastated its entire ecosystem, but lately it's been doing much better.

The vast majority of the island (76%) is owned by The Nature Conservancy and off limits to mere mortals. 24%, the eastern side, belongs to the National Park Service and is part of the Channel Islands National Park. The main capground is at Scorpions's Harbor, and it's a pretty accessible place with year-round water and such. We also wanted to do some backcountry hiking/camping, so we decided to land at Prisoner's Harbor, spend a night at the one and only backcountry campsite they have, Del Norte, then hike over to Scorpions for another night. There's no water at Del Norte, so we hade to carry enough for about 24 hours and a total of cca 15 miles of hiking in relatively warm weather.

Day 1 - L.A. to Ventura - Prisoner's Harbor - Del Norte Campground

Ventura Harbor awaited us in the fog at 7a.m., and we loaded all the gear into the belly of the ship. We only kept a small bag with some water and snacks with us. The backpacks had a gallon jug of water each, plus their Platypus bags filled to the brim. The ship cleared the coastal fog quickly, and it was a gorgeous day.

Approaching Scorpion's Anchorage.

Approaching Scorpion's Anchorage. The image is tilted because I kept the camera level with the boat, but the boat itself was tiled relative to the horizon.

First stop was at Scorpion's Anchorage to drop people off, then on to Prisoner's Harbor, where five or six of us disembarked for Del Norte, and a huge group of college students was dropped of — they were headed to the UCLA research station on the Conservancy side of the island. A few trucks with trailers hauled them off and we were left alone on the beach. The other guys headed for Del Norte left way ahead of us. True to our form, it took us a long time to get organized and going.

There are two ways to get to Del Norte from Prisoner's: there's a trail that along the beach, rollercoastering up and down on the hills, then climbing up to the campground. It's almost a mile shorter than the other route, which is to take the dirt road up to Navy Road on the ridge, and then descend to Del Norte on side road from there. We decided to take the latter, as the beach trail seemed way more strenous by looking at the map.

On Navy Road, looking east-north-east

On Navy Road, looking east-north-east

The climb up to navy road is steep, but not terribly, and of course our packs were pretty heavy from all the water, but we did good time. The area is disastrously covered with fennel — it got away from a kitched garden decades ago and spread all over the island, choking the natvie vegetation. Making things worse, there used to be big population of feral pigs on the island, and they were "roto-tilling" the earth when looking for food, making it a perfect breeding ground for the fennel. The fennel forms a thick, 6-7 feet, reed-like jungle in most places, and even if you like the smell of anise, it gets old quickly. It's not nearly enough to ruin the beauty of the place and ruin the trip, but it's good to hear that supposedly they're making some progress against it.

The hike to to Del Norte is about 4 miles, so we got there about two hours later. To our surprise, nobody else was there. There are only four sites in the entire campground, and three are pretty exposed, so we selected the one that looked best to us, under a beautiful oak tree. Eahc site has a table with food storage locker, and as the next pleasant surprise, there was almost half a gallon of water in there and a nice big tarp.

Our camp at Del Norte

Our camp at Del Norte

We went for a walk, visiting a nearby cluster of buildings which more than likely was a horse ranch earlier. The main house looked like it still saw some use now and then, there were obvious signs of poeple having stayed there recently and the field around is was mowed. It's in a perfect place — oh how we'd love to spend a week there!

This is where we saw out first island fox, curiously observing us from the distance. They are small-bodies foxes, endemic to the Channel Island (and each island has a unique subspecies). In the 1990's, their numbers dropped dramatically, and they almost went extinct. The NPS and other agencies launched a recovery program, capturing many of them and breeding them in huge caged facilities in several spots on the islands. They recovered remarkably well, and supposedly now they're back to about 90% of their former population. We saw quite a few of them during the next two days, and couldn't get enough. Here's a good link with info about their plight.

Maintenance (?) building near Del Norte

Maintenance (?) building near Del Norte

The evening was balmy and calm, with clear skies and a deafening silence. An island scrubjay paid us a visit before sundown. They are also endemic to Santa Cruz, and because the lack of predators, they're a big bigger and bluer than their mainland counterparts. However, their "song" is just as shrieky.

Our water was holding up nicely, we even dared to wash our hand carefully with a small part of that extra half gallon, and after a late dinner, we slept like babies.

Sunset over Santa Cruz island

Sunset over Santa Cruz island

Day 2 - Del Norte to Scorpion's Campground

The morning came with rolling fog sweeping the campground back and forth, sometimes reducing the visibility to a few feet, then showing us the ocean down below. As soon as we packed up, we headed down the Del Borte Trail, going west. Everything was green and the wildflowers were blooming, we were happy not to listen to some people's advice who said to come in the fall when the weather is more stable.

Hiking Del Norte Trail

Hiking Del Norte Trail

The trail connects to Navy Road after about two-three miles, following the ridgeline. The view all around is amazing. The fog kept low, we were mostly above it, and it looked like we're walking on clouds. On the mainland, only the top of the mountains could be seen. We met a guy in a pickup truck, looked like we was driving to the military radar installation on top of the hill. He stopped and asked whether we had enough water. Other than him, we only met one single hiker coming our way, headed to Del Norte.

Around 1pm, we sat in the shade of some small pine trees to have lunch, then kept going for a while, and stopped again for a snack above Chinese Harbor.

Snack break on Navy Road.

Snack break on Navy Road. Chinese Harbor is at the bottom of the canyon.

Before reaching Montañon Ridge, Nayv Roads ends and becomes a trail. There's a very steep, but short climb up to the ridge with spectacular rock formations and huge diversity of wildflowers. The ridge itself offers fantastic views all around, including the olive grove at Smuggler's Cove, which we indented to visit the next day. We caught our breath and kept moving. From the ridge, all we needed to do is descend to Scorpion, about 3.5 miles.

Approaching the top of Montanon Ridge, looking back the way we came from

Approaching the top of Montanon Ridge, looking back the way we came from

On Montanon Ridge

On Montanon Ridge

The terrain was very rocky, there was a part we dubbed "Mars" as it was very barren and everything was reddish from iron oxide. Em's fett started to hurt bad, turns out the EVA in the soles of her shoes started collapsing and weren't offering too much cushioning anymore. She was suffering pretty badly and we kept taking short breaks to give her aching feet a respite.

We examined the remnants of an old drilling operation, even the drill head was still there, then continued our descent, and by the mid-afternoon, with about two liters of water left, we arrived at the huge eucalyptus grove that was home to Scorpion Campground. It's a pretty big camp with tables, food storage boxes, pit toilets and water taps. The main building of teh former ranch are a bit further down, closer to the beach.

Scorpion's Campground

Scorpion's Campground

As soon as we settled down and pitched the tent, Em got some rest and her feet were doing much better. It was early, so we went for a long walk, going up to Cavern Point, which offers impossible views of the island, this time made even more dramatic by the rolling fog. We also spent some time down by the beach at the landing, to take in the sunshine and relax a bit.

Em and the fog and the island

Em and the fog and the island

Several foxes showed themselves to us on this walk, one of them even gave us a show, playing and jumping around, having fun with some victim (a mouse or a lizard) for almost ten minutes.

Later that night, after dinner, we were sitting at our table with the headlamps turned off, enjoying the night air. Two idiots who were camped a few spots over came our way on the trail, and they started harrassing one of the foxes. The poor thing didn't even go near theyr gear or do anything, but these jerks started throwing rocks at it and chagin it — stupidly enough — towards their own campsite. They did this right under our nose, but didn't see us in the dark. It was funny to see how startled they were and how quickly they scurried away when all of a sudden Em shouted at them to leave the poor fox alone.

Fog, fox, fennel

Fog, fox, fennel

Day 3 - Scorpion to Smuggler's Cove and back to L.A.

Our ship was not supposed to leave until 2pm, and Em's feet were not hurting anymore, so we stuck to the original plan and took off in the foggy morning towards Smuggler's Cove. The fog made things even more interesting, but I was hoping it would lift soon.

On the foggy trail to Suggler's Cove

On the foggy trail to Suggler's Cove

The hike to Smuggler's is about 7-8 miles round-trip and well worth the effort. It's a dirt road all the way, which first climbs steeply out of Scorpion Anchorage to the top of the rock, then undulates on the hills for a while before meandering down to the cove. This used to me another part of the ranch, with one pretty big building still standing (featuring a neat sundial on the facade) and a very nice olive grove thriving, despite of having gotten no care for decades. Olives are very hardy plants, and this is their original climate zone anyway. The building has a very cool sundial on the front

The beach at the cove was just as foggy, making for a pretty dramatic sight. There's another grove of eucalyptus just above the tide line, and the NPS put out some picnic tables, so we ate our lunch there.

Beach at Suggler's Cove

Beach at Suggler's Cove

It was still early, but we headed back soon. As we were climbing up the hill again, the fog started breaking, and 10 minutes later, the sun was balzing down on us. Finally, we got some good views of the surroudings, including the ocean and the mainland.

Headed towards Scorpion's Anchorage on Smuggler's Road.

Headed towards Scorpion's Anchorage on Smuggler's Road. No fog tihs time.

Back at Scorpions, we packed up camp, then strolled down to the beach, taking up positions at one of the picnic tables around the old ranch buildings. One of them is a museum, which we visisted (it's really informative if your're interested in the history of the island), and marveled at another building, which was apparently a residence for the rangers or the caretakers with a very nicely groomed and maintained garden full of flowers. To live in a place like this and even get paid for it... Side note: the actual ranger station is on the hill behind the campground, on the trail going to Potato Harbor and Cavern Point.

Santa Cruz island disappearing in the fog yet again

Santa Cruz island disappearing in the fog yet again

Time flew by, and the ship soon arrived, ready to take us back. As soon as we left, the fog started rolling in again, obscuring the island. Both of us were in an elated mood, joking about getting a seal lion and a fox as pets, and already talking about what's next.

Official website and hiking map for the island with trail descriptions and mileages.

Take a look at the full gallery.

Em looking at the mainland from top of a hill on Santa Cruz Island

Em looking at the mainland from top of a hill on Santa Cruz Island